Category: Latest Issue

JACSON: Vol. 5 No. 1, 2018 (June 20, 2018)

EDITORIAL: Vol. 5 No. 1, 2018 by editor in chief

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Jacson is one of journals published by JACSOnline Group Publisher (JACSOnline GP). Jacson is a scientific journal as a window of scholars from the field of Applied Chemical Science to disseminate their research works and opinion. The Jacson operates the non-profit work based on the rule according to the CC by NC SA 3.0.  Formerly Jacson is a Jacsonline (j-a-c-s-online)-Journal of Applied Chemical Science-online, however, since September 2016 the Jacsonline had moved to be a publisher and the remained journal of applied chemical science was stated to be named as a Jacson. Since there, the logo of the journal applied since 2012 was removed and its style partially changed. Because of these changes, there is shown differently in logo and style of articles between 2012 to 2015 and thereafter published. Moreover, during the periods up to 2015, the volume and the edition were not having a publishing fixed time. These facts were the first generation in Jacson management.

                The 2016 was the new stage of the Journal of Applied Chemical Science known as Jacson as mentioned above. There was not only changed in it brand style (logo) and separated its website from the publisher only but also the timing of the publishing was decided to perform which is December 14 and June 20. The December 14, 2016 was decided to start the first new version of the publishing processes with 5 articles. Once launching that new rule, the jacson publishes annually one volume with two editions. There is shown that volume 4, 2017 has two editions which are Vol. 4 No.1 and Vol. 4 No. 2, respectively. There were 6 articles for each edition of the Vol. 4 No.1 and Vol. 4 No. 2, respectively. This might be known as the six article rules. The six article rules were included the numbers of article published, reviewing process, included in digital object identifier (DOI), article charges system for open access, and ordering for the hard copy.

                All those changes within the six article rules applied above were for an adaptation of the JACSOnline GP with a new system as a member of the Publisher International Linking Association (PILA) under Crossref section. Since there, the JACSOnline GP ensures the articles published by the Jacson matched with the regulation encouraged by the PILA under the Crossref section. The DOI: 10.22341 is the unique identity of the JACSOnline GP among the publishers throughout the world.  Since Jacson’s articles have own DOI under the umbrella of JACSOnline GP, the articles disseminated by the Jacson are more visible. The articles published are now indexed in any international data bases such as Google Scholar, Crossref, Scilit, Chemical Abstract Service, and Copernicus. Since there, the Jacson as a scientific journal has been on its sit as one of the Scientific International Journals. Because of numbers and qualities of manuscripts entering the Jacson significantly increased, Vol. 5 No.1, numbers of articles disseminated by the Jacson increased which were 10 articles. Therefore, the rules of six articles are significantly moved into the 10 article rules.

https://doi.org/10.22341/jacs.on.00501p434

 

Effect of Concentration of Soursop (Annona muricata) Leaf and Soaking Time on Protein and Fat Contents and Sensory Quality of Raw Chicken Meat

Diana A. Wuri1, Jublin F. Bale-Therik2, and Gomera Bouk2

1Department of  Public Health Veterinary, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Nusa Cendana University, Kupang 85361; 2Department of Animal Science, Post Graduate School,  Nusa Cendana University, Kupang 85361, INDONESIA

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The purpose of this study was to find out the effect of concentration of soursop (Annona muricata) leaf and soaking time on protein and fat contents and sensory quality of raw chicken meat during storage.  This research was conducted in Laboratory of Animal Products Technology, Faculty of Animal Husbandry Nusa Cendana University and Laboratory of Veterinary Public Health, East Nusa Tenggara Province Livestock Services Kupang, Indonesia.  The experiment was arranged in completely randomized design in a 4×3 factorial lay out with three replications.  The first factor was concentration of soursop leaf in water (C) with four levels: 0, 10, 20, and 30 g/L water. The second factor was soaking time of chicken meat (T) with three levels: 0, 10, and 20 minutes. The quality of chicken meat changes were monitored chemically and organoleptically at hours 12 of storage time. Data collected of protein and fat contents of chicken meat were analyzed using Analysis of Variance and continued with Duncan’s Multiple Range Test, while data of organoleptic properties (color and aroma) characteristics were compared using the Kruskal Wallis Test. It was found that both treatment factors concentration of soursop leaf and soaking time with the interactions had significant effect (P<0.01) on protein and fat content of chicken meat. These results also indicated that color characteristics of chicken meat detected by the descriptive panelist were significantly affected by the both factors concentration of soursop leaf and soaking time (P<0.05), while aroma characteristics were insignificantly affected by the treatments.

https://doi.org/10.22341/jacson.00501p388

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AHN J, GRUN I, MUSTAPHA A. Effects of plant extracts on microbial growth, color change, and lipid oxidation in cooked beef. F. 2007;24(1):7-14. doi:10.1016/j.fm.2006.04.006
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Artés F, Gómez PA, Artés-Hernández F. Physical, Physiological and Microbial Deterioration of Minimally Fresh                Processed Fruits and Vegetables. F. 2007;13(3):177-188. doi:10.1177/1082013207079610
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Botsoglou NA, Grigoropoulou SH, Botsoglou E, Govaris A, Papageorgiou G. The effects of dietary oregano essential oil and α-tocopheryl acetate on lipid oxidation in raw and cooked turkey during refrigerated storage. M. 2003;65(3):1193-1200. doi:10.1016/s0309-1740(03)00029-9
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Brannan RG. Effect of Grape Seed Extract on Physicochemical Properties of Ground, Salted, Chicken Thigh Meat during Refrigerated Storage at Different Relative Humidity Levels. Journal of Food Science. 2007;73(1):C36-C40. doi:10.1111/j.1750-3841.2007.00588.x
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Devatkal SK, Naveena BM. Effect of salt, kinnow and pomegranate fruit by-product powders on color and oxidative stability of raw ground goat meat during refrigerated storage. M. 2010;85(2):306-311. doi:10.1016/j.meatsci.2010.01.019
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Kumar Y, Yadav DN, Ahmad T, Narsaiah K. Recent Trends in the Use of Natural Antioxidants for Meat and Meat Products. C. 2015;14(6):796-812. doi:10.1111/1541-4337.12156
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Maqsood S, Benjakul S. Preventive effect of tannic acid in combination with modified atmospheric packaging on the quality losses of the refrigerated ground beef. F. 2010;21(9):1282-1290. doi:10.1016/j.foodcont.2010.02.018
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Medina-Meza IG, Barnaba C, Barbosa-Cánovas GV. Effects of high pressure processing on lipid oxidation: A review. I. 2014;22:1-10. doi:10.1016/j.ifset.2013.10.012
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Rouger A, Tresse O, Zagorec M. Bacterial Contaminants of Poultry Meat: Sources, Species, and Dynamics. M. 2017;5(3):50. doi:10.3390/microorganisms5030050

The Effectiveness of Bio-Slurry and Inorganic Fertilizer Combination on the Performance of Rice (Oryza sativa L)

Ahmad Khanafi, Yafizham, and D.W. Widjajanto*

Ecology and Crop Production Laboratory, Department of Agriculture, Faculty of Animal and Agricultural Sciences, Diponegoro University, Semarang 50275 – INDONESIA

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The experiment was aimed to investigate the effectiveness of bio-slurry and inorganic fertilizer combination on the performance of two rice varieties. A completely randomized design of factorial pattern was used throughout the experiment. The first factor was the combination of bio-slurry and NPK fertilizer that consisted of P0 : no added fertilizer, P1 : NPK fertilizer only, 550 kg/ha; P2 : bio-slurry 2.3 tons/ha + NPK fertilizer 400 kg/ha; P3 : bio-slurry 4.6 tons/ha + NPK fertilizer 250 kg/ha; P4 : bio-slurry 6.9 tons/ha + NPK fertilizer 100 kg/ha; and P5 : bio-slurry only, 8.5 tons/ha. Treatments were applied based on nitrogen recomended doses of rice, 165 kg N/ha. The second factor was rice varieties that consisted of V1 : IR-64 and V2 : Ciherang. Each treatment was repeated three times. Parameters observed were plant height, number of tillers, weight of 1,000 grains, and rice production. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and followed by Duncan’s Multiple Range Test. On the basis of the experimental results it was concluded that bio-slurry may replace the role of inorganic fertilizer in rice production, especially IR-64 and Ciherang varieties.

https://doi.org/10.22341/jacson.00501p418

Analysis of Mercury (Hg) in Whitening Cream Distributed in Palu City by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

Endah Dwijayanti1 and Susanti2

1Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematical and Sciences, Islam University of Makassar, 2Department Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Airlangga University of Surabaya. INDONESIA

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This study aimed to obtain chemical data of mercury from some whitening cream distributed in Palu City. The whitening cream samples consisted of 3 groups (A, B and C), each sample of the group was extracted through wet destructions. The qualitative analysis was with HCl 2.0 M, KI 0.50 N, NaOH 2.0 N reagents, while the quantitative analysis was performed with Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The results of the qualitative analysis indicated that the A sample reacted with NaOH 2.0 N reagent delivered yellow precipitates and C sample with KI 0.50 N reagent delivered red precipitates. Both data indicated that both samples showed positive reaction of Hg (II). However, the B samples did not occur the positive reaction indicating Hg.  Based on Indonesian National Agency of Drug and Food Control (BPOM) regulation, (No.HK.03.1.23.07.11.6662 of 2011) related to the requirements of microbe and heavy metals contamination in cosmetics, the Hg (II) concentration in cream should be no more than 1,000.0 μg g-1. AAS results found in present study demonstrated that A sample holded mercury content over the level required by the BPOM, which it was 4,554.00 μg g-1.  The B and C samples were 47.18 and 780.32 μg g-1 respectively, both samples did not exceed the limits set by the regulation but continuous application might be toxic for body.

https://doi.org/10.22341/jacson.00501p430

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Peregrino CP, Moreno MV, Miranda SV, Rubio AD, Leal LO. Mercury Levels in Locally Manufactured Mexican Skin-Lightening Creams. I. 2011;8(6):2516-2523. doi:10.3390/ijerph8062516

Validation of Analytical Method Determination of Sodium Dodecyl Benzene Sulfonate (DBS) in Catfish (Clarias batrachus L.) by Spectrophotometric Using Methylene Blue

Christiani Dewi Q. M. Bulin1, Adhitasari Suratman2, and Roto2

1Department of Chemistry,  Faculty of Mathematical and Natural Sciences, Widya Mandira Catholic University Kupang; 2Department of Chemistry,  Faculty of Mathematical and Natural Sciences, Gadjah Mada University – Yogyakarta, INDONESIA

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A spectrophotometric method for analysis of DBS anionic surfactant in Clarias batracus has been validated. The method of analysis was divided into two phases. Extraction with solid-liquid extraction using Soxhlet and analysis of DBS. The extraction was performed using solvent of n-hexane and methanol for 9 and 6 hours, respectively. The analysis was performed using Spectrophotometer UV-Vis based on the complex formation of DBS-methylene blue (DBS-MB). This methods is applied to the determination of DBS in local catfish after DBS exposure and that of obtained in markets. The results showed that the parameters of validation methods have high acceptability as linierity (R2 = 0.99), limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ ) (2.93 mg/g and 9.75 mg/g), sensitivity (ε = 2.44 x 105 L mol-1 cm-1), precision (RSD = 0.14-1.38%) and accuracy (% recovery in a range 82-110 %). The results of analysis of DBS in catfish with 2.5; 5; 10; 15 mg/L of DBS concentration exposure are 0.87; 1.67; 8.50 and 18.10 mg/kg, respectively and catfish from markets in a range 8.5-61 mg/kg. The result showed that the method of analysis of DBS anionic surfactant using MB could be applied for catfish samples.

https://doi.org/10.22341/jacson.00501p414

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Molecular Docking and Toxicity Test of Apigenin Derivative Compounds as an Anti-Aging Agent

Esti Mumpuni and Esti Mulatsari

Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Pancasila, South of Jakarta, 12640, IINDONESIA

The JACSOnline Group Publisher publishes the work under the licensing of a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Authors retain the copyright to their work. Users may read, copy and distribute the work in any medium  provided the authors and the journal are appropriately credited. The users may not use the material for commercial purposes.

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The intrinsic factors that caused aging are enzymes such as hyaluronidase and elastase by oxidative stress mechanism. Antioxidants are the bioactive compounds which are highly important to fight against oxidative stress that can cause aging. Modified compounds o121–15f apigenin have reported can act as an antioxidant. The aim of this study was to determine candidate of apigenin derivative compounds that were potential to inhibit hyaluronidase and elastase enzyme by using molecular docking method with human target protein with pdb.id : 2JIE and 5JMY. Molecular docking was done using windows operating system with several softwares, i.e: PLANTS, YASARA and MarVinSketch. Visualization of bonding modes between the ligand and amino acid residues was done with PyMol. Of the 50 apigenin derivative compounds tested, obtained 9 compounds with lower docking scores than apigenin in inhibiting hyaluronidase and 5 compounds in inhibiting elastase enzyme. 3’6-diamineapigenin had the lowest docking score (-62.39) in inhibiting hyaluronidase enzyme (2JIE) and 3’amineapigenin had the lowest docking score (-91.31) in inhibiting elastase enzyme (5JMY). The binding interactions of the actively docked conformations of the ligand and the target protein have been identified and showed the most amino acid residues that considered affect hyaluronidase and elastase inhibition process such as VAL_710, GLU_762 and VAL_763. Based on these results, there are some antioxidants of the apigenin derivative compounds that recommended as an anti-aging agent.

https://doi.org/10.22341/jacson.00501p409

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Korb O, Stützle T, Exner TE. Empirical Scoring Functions for Advanced Protein−Ligand Docking with PLANTS. J. 2009;49(1):84-96. doi:10.1021/ci800298z
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Synthetic C-Methoxyphenyl Calix [4] Resorcinarene and Its Antioxidant Activity

Budiana I Gusti M. Ngurah

Department of Chemistry Education, Faculty of Education and Teachers Training, Nusa Cendana University, Jl. Adisucipto Penfui Kupang, 85001, INDONESIA

The JACSOnline Group Publisher publishes the work under the licensing of a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Authors retain the copyright to their work. Users may read, copy and distribute the work in any medium  provided the authors and the journal are appropriately credited. The users may not use the material for commercial purposes.

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C-methoxy calix[4]resorcinarene macromolecule is one of calysarene group compounds.The calysarene compounds have been reported to have any beneficial functions in various applications in medical field, such as an adsorbent for sunscreen and heavy metal, anti-HIV and HCV, and anti tumour. The C-methoxyphenyl calix[4]resorcinarene (CMPCR) is one of the C-methoxy calix [4] resorcinarene derivatives, in which researches in application of C-methoxy calix[4]resorcinarene itself in the medical field is rarely conducted. In present study, the researcher attempted to synthesize the CMPCR compound and followed by charaterizations of the synthetic compound resulted using infrared spectrophotometer  instrument, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR), and carbon-nuclear magnetic resonance (C-NMR) methods to ensure that the product is CMPCR compound.  The yielded compound was further tested to recognize its antioxidant activity. The antioxidant testing required is in line with the increases of diseases caused by over concentration of the free radicals existing in biocellular system. The CMPCR synthesis was performed by condensation and antioxidant activity was tested using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) methods. Results showed that the reaction product was white precipitate with 390 oC melting point and the reaction yield was 97.05%. The antioxidant activity showed that its IC50 value equal to 79 ppm. Comparing to the vitamin C which has IC50 equal to 20.96 ppm, the CMPCR compound-the synthetic product, has level qualification of antioxidant activity equal to strong (IC50 <100).

https://doi.org/10.22341/jacson.00501p403

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Tsou LK, Dutschman GE, Gullen EA, Telpoukhovskaia M, Cheng Y-C, Hamilton AD. Discovery of a synthetic dual inhibitor of HIV and HCV infection based on a tetrabutoxy-calix[4]arene scaffold. B. 2010;20(7):2137-2139. doi:10.1016/j.bmcl.2010.02.043
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Performances of Zeolite, Coconut Shell, and Zeolite+Coconut Shell-Based Water Cartridges to Minimize Contaminants of Drinking Water

Yohanes Buang, Suwari, David Tambaru, and Antonius R. Basa Ola

Department of Chemistry , Faculty of Sciences and Engineering, Nusa Cendana University, Kupang, INDONESIA

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Performances of zeolite, coconut shell, and zeolite+coconut shell-based water cartridges to minimize contaminants of drinking waters were conducted in the present study. The zeolite stones and coconut shell charcoal were powdered to be ≥ 60 meshes. The powders were packed into a cartridge to provide zeolite, coconut shell, and zeolite+coconut shell (1:2) cartridges, respectively. Well waters allowed to flow through each cartridge for a month. Thereafter, each water filtrate was harvested and analyzed numbers of parameters from four variables included in the quality table of drinking water. The total coliform found in each 100 mL of the well water equaled to 460 MPN (most possible number) while the fecal coli equaled to 150. When the well water flowed through the developing cartridges, the MPN content varied which depended on the cartridge materials qualitative compositions. Total coliform remained in water filtrates of the well waters flowed through the cartridges made of zeolite, coconut charcoal, and their mixture (1:2 by volume) were 38, 240, and 96 MPN, respectively. These developing cartridges, therefore, could remove these total coliform from the well waters by 92, 48, and 79 %, respectively. Overall, the performance of the developing cartridge made of zeolite was highest among those cartridges.

https://doi.org/10.22341/jacson.00501p377

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Buang Y, Suwari, Ola ARB. Effects of pH changes in water-based solvents to isolate antibacterial activated extracts of natural products. In: Author(s); 2017. doi:10.1063/1.5015997
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Use of Polymer Membranes for Modeling Desulfurization in the Process of Pervaporation through Artificial Neural Network

1Mansoor Kazemimoghadam1 and Nastatran Sadeghi2

1Department of Chemical Engineering, Malek-Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran, IRAN, 2Department of Chemical Engineering, South Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, IRAN

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The present study considered the amount of thiophene alkane separation within the process of pervaporation by use of of membrane polyethylene glycol and polydimethyl siloxane-polyacrylonitrile with the help of Artificial Neural Network modeling. In this research, the effects of such parameters as Volumetric flow rate and temperature, as well as feedstuff properties (separation factor and flux) on the Desulfurization process efficiency were evaluated, and the Multi Layers Perceptron (MLP) neural network feed forward along with Propagation learning algorithm and Levenberg-Marquardt function with inputs and outputs were implemented. Tansig activation algorithm was used for the hidden layer, and Purelin algorithm was utilized for the output layer. Furthermore, 5 neurons were defined for the hidden layer. After processing the data, 70 percent were allocated for learning, 15% were allocated for validity, and the remaining 15% were allocated for the experience. The achieved results with the aforementioned method had a suitable accuracy. The graphs of the error percentage for the actual values of the separation factor and flux outputs were compared to the achieved values from modeling through related membranes for evaluating the efficiency of pervaporation process in separation of ethanol, Acetone, and butanol from water. Finally, the graphs were drawn.

https://doi.org/10.22341/jacson.00501p383

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Making and Comparing the Performance of Zeolite Membranes

Mansoor Kazemimoghadam

Malek Ashtar University of Technology,Tehran; IRAN

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Zeolite membranes NaA, ZSM-5, Mordenite, NaX and NaY grown onto seeded mullite supports. Separation performance of zeolite membranes were studied for water-dimethylhydrazine mixtures using pervaporation (PV). The best Flux and separation factor of the membranes were 0.62 kg/m2.h and 52000, respectively, for NaA zeolite membrane. Strong electrostatic interaction between ionic sites and water molecules (due to its polar nature) makes the zeolite NaA membrane very hydrophilic. Zeolite NaA membranes are thus well suited for separating liquid-phase mixtures by pervaporation. In this study, experiments were conducted with various dimethylhydrazine –water mixtures (1–20 wt. %) at 25. Total flux for UDMH–water mixtures was found to vary from 0.331 to 0.241 kg/m2.h with increasing UDMH concentration from 1 to 20 wt.%. Ionic sites of the NaA zeolite matrix play a very important role in water transport through the membrane. Surface diffusion of water occurs in an activated fashion through these sites. A comparison between experimental flux and calculated flux using Stephan Maxwell (S.M.) correlation was made and a linear trend was found to exist for water flux through the membrane with UDMH concentration.

https://doi.org/10.22341/jacson.00501p394

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